Urban Economics > References > 2008

    
References > 2008

 
 
  • Lazzeretti, Luciana, Boix, Rafael and Capone, Francesco (2008):
    Do creative industries cluster? Mapping Creative Local Production Systems in Italy and Spain”, Industry and Innovation, Vol 15, nº 5, p. 549-567.

    Abstract: An important debate on the role of creativity and culture as factors in local economic development is distinctly emerging. Despite the emphasis put on the theoretical definition of these concepts, it is necessary to strengthen comparative research for the identification and analysis of the kind of creativity embedded in a given territory. Creative local production systems are identified, in Italy and Spain, that depart from local labour markets as territorial units and focus on two different kinds of creative industries: traditional cultural industries (publishing, music, architecture and engineering, performing arts) and technology-related creative industries (R&D, ICT, advertising). The results show a concentration of creative industries in the largest urban systems, although different patterns of concentration of creative industries are revealed between the two countries.
     

  • Boix, R and V. Galletto (2008):
    Marshallian industrial districts in Spain”, Scienze Regionali / Italian Journal of Regional Science, Vol.7, nº 3, p. 29-52. ISSN 1720-3929.

    Abstract: Identification of the boundaries of industrial districts is necessary to perform empirical and quantitative analysis. Maps of industrial districts make it possible not only to analyse particular districts but also to obtain a comprehensive overview of the importance of this phenomenon in a country, its typologies, spatial distribution, and to conduct cross country comparisons. The aim of this study is to produce a map of industrial districts in Spain using the Sforzi-ISTAT (2006) methodology, and to compare it with similar maps for Italy and the United Kingdom. The results confirm the quantitative importance of Marshallian industrial districts in Spain (205 industrial districts, which account for 20% of total jobs and 35% of manufacturing jobs), close to the Italian figures and greater than those for the United Kingdom. The results also make it possible to compare the main similarities and differences between the industrial districts in these countries.
     

  • Galletto, V. (2008)
    Los distritos industriales en España: identificación, innovación y política industrial”, I JORNADAS DE HISTORIA EMPRESARIAL: ESPAÑA Y EUROPA Centre d’Estudis Antoni de Capmany d’Economia i Història Econòmica Universitat de Barcelona, diciembre de 2008.


    Abstract: TLa teoría del distrito industrial se remonta e inspira en la obra del economista neoclásico Alfred Marshall y en la reciente recuperación del concepto por parte del economista italiano Giacomo Becattini. En ella se retoma la idea que las economías o ventajas de la producción en gran escala se pueden conseguir no sólo internamente a la gran empresa, sino también externamente, mediante la “concentración de un gran número de pequeñas empresas similares en el mismo lugar” (Marshall 1890). En este trabajo pretendemos presentar algunos de los desarrollos más recientes realizados para el caso español. En primer lugar, presentaremos la identificación de sistemas locales de trabajo (SLT) y de SLT con características de distrito industrial en España, siguiendo la metodología Sofrzi-ISTAT. En segundo lugar, nos centraremos en las economías externas presentes en los distritos industriales. Utilizando el mapa de sistemas productivos locales, se presenta la primera aplicación que se ha realizado para medir estas economías de distrito en términos de innovación. A continuación, se hará referencia a la instrumentación actual en España de políticas industriales que tratan precisamente de fomentar y explotar la existencia de estas economías externas como medio para aumentar la productividad y la competitividad de las empresas. Por último, se presentan unas breves conclusiones.
     

  • Boix, R. and Veneri, P. (2008)
    Identification of metropolitan areas in Spain and Italy”,
    48th European Congress of the European Regional Science Association. Liverpool, August 27th - 31st.

    Abstract: Metropolitan areas concentrate the main share of population, production and consumption in OECD countries. They are likely to be the most important units for economic, social and environmental analysis as well as for the development of policy strategies. However, one of the main problems that occur when adopting metropolitan areas as units of analysis and policy in European countries is the absence of widely accepted standards for identifying them. This severe problem appeared when we tried to perform comparative research between Spain and Italy using metropolitan areas as units of analysis. The aim of this paper is to identify metropolitan areas in Spain and Italy using similar methodologies. The results allow comparing the metropolitan realities of both countries as well as providing the metropolitan units that can be used in subsequent comparative researches. Two methodologies are proposed: the Cheshire-GEMACA methodology (FUR) and an iterative version of the USA-MSA algorithm, particularly adapted to deal with polycentric metropolitan areas (DMA). Both methods show a good approximation to the metropolitan reality and produce very similar results: 75 FUR and 67 DMA in Spain (75% of total population and employment), and 81 FUR and 86 DMA in Italy (70% of total population and employment).
     

  • Boix, Rafael (2004):
    Regional economics”, reseña del libro Regional Economics de Roberta Capello. Investigaciones Regionales nº 12, p.219-221. ISSN: 1695-7253.
     

  • Boix, R. (2008):
    Industrial districts, innovation and I-district effect: territory or industrial specialization?”,
    Working Paper 08.07 Departament d'Economia Aplicada, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

    Abstract: The I-district effect hypothesis establishes the existence of highly intense innovation in Marshallian industrial districts due to the presence of external localization economies. However, industrial districts are characterized by specific manufacturing specializations in such a way that this effect could be due to these dominant specializations. The objective of this research is to test whether the effect is explained by the conditions of the territory or by the industrial specialization and to provide additional evidence of the existence and causes of the highly intense innovation in industrial districts (I-district effect). The estimates for Spain of a fixed effects model interacting territory and industry suggest that the high innovative performance of industrial districts is maintained across sectors whereas the industrial specialization behaves differently depending on the type of local production system in which it is placed. The I-district effect is related to the conditions of the territory more than to the industrial specialization. The territory is a key variable in explaining the processes of innovation and should be considered a basic dimension in the design of innovation and industrial policies.
     

  • Boix, R. (2008):
    Industrial districts, innovation and I-district effect: territory or industrial specialization?”, EUNIP International Conference 2008, San Sebastian, 10th-12th September 2008..


    Abstract: The I-district effect hypothesis establishes the existence of highly intense innovation in Marshallian industrial districts due to the presence of external localization economies. However, industrial districts are characterized by specific manufacturing specializations in such a way that this effect could be due to these dominant specializations. The objective of this research is to test whether the effect is explained by the conditions of the territory or by the industrial specialization and to provide additional evidence of the existence and causes of the highly intense innovation in industrial districts (I-district effect). The estimates for Spain of a fixed effects model interacting territory and industry suggest that the high innovative performance of industrial districts is maintained across sectors whereas the industrial specialization behaves differently depending on the type of local production system in which it is placed. The I-district effect is related to the conditions of the territory more than to the industrial specialization. The territory is a key variable in explaining the processes of innovation and should be considered a basic dimension in the design of innovation and industrial policies.
     

  • Boix, R. (2008):
    Industrial districts, innovation and I-district effect: territory or industrial specialization?”, Regions: The Dilemmas of Integration and Competition” Regional Studies Association International Conference, Prague 27th - 29th May 2008.


    Abstract: The I-district effect hypothesis establishes the existence of highly intense innovation in Marshallian industrial districts due to the presence of external localization economies. However, industrial districts are characterized by specific manufacturing specializations in such a way that this effect could be due to these dominant specializations. The objective of this research is to test whether the effect is explained by the conditions of the territory or by the industrial specialization and to provide additional evidence of the existence and causes of the highly intense innovation in industrial districts (I-district effect). The estimates for Spain of a fixed effects model interacting territory and industry suggest that the high innovative performance of industrial districts is maintained across sectors whereas the industrial specialization behaves differently depending on the type of local production system in which it is placed. The I-district effect is related to the conditions of the territory more than to the industrial specialization. The territory is a key variable in explaining the processes of innovation and should be considered a basic dimension in the design of innovation and industrial policies.
     

  • Trullén, Joan (2008):
    "La política industrial: apoyando un cambio estructural en la industria", Revista "Economistas, nº 116 (Extra Marzo 2008) “España 2007. Un balance", p.77-82.


    Abstract: Se está asistiendo a un cambio importante en la función de producción de la economía española. Está avanzando la productividad industrial a ritmos importantes. El crecimiento de la capacidad inversora en bienes de equipo y el gasto en I+D+i constituyen señales claras de que la economía española está avanzando en el cambio de modelo productivo. En consecuencia, parece necesario insistir en políticas industriales que incidan en esta dirección, como las diseñadas a lo largo de esta legislatura.
     

  • Capone, Francesco and Boix, Rafael (2008):
    "Sources of growth and competitiveness of local tourist production systems: An application to Italy (1991-2001),
    The Annals of Regional Science, Vol. 42, nº1, p. 209-224. ISBN ISSN 0570-1864.

    Abstract: Local development can assume many forms, depending on the environmental characteristics of places and the way they evolve historically. Tourist resorts are concentrated on space, forming a well-defined geography of local productive systems which show very different growth rates. The aim of this paper is to establish a geography of local tourist production systems in Italy, and to explore their sources of growth and competitiveness. Results suggest that higher levels of growth are not based on natural endowments but on localization economies, especially on the presence of all the phases of a “tourist filière”, a chain of economic activities directly related to tourism production, in the local production system.
     

  • Trullén, Joan and Rafael Boix (2008):
    Knowledge externalities and networks of cities in creative metropolis”, en P.Cooke and L.Lazzeretti (eds), Creative cities, cultural clusters and local economic development. Edward Elgar. ISBN 1847202683 / 978-1847202680, pp.211-236.

    Abstract: Cities and metropolitan areas are our main engine of production and development. They have long concentrated and coordinated the use of urbanized land, labor and capital. Metropolitan areas produce, process, exchange and market the main amount of knowledge and creativity in the world. At the same time they generate agglomeration economies and obtain spatially mobile network economies from their links with other cities. Departing from the fact that metropolitan growth is the sum of the growth of the cities that form the metropolitan area, the present research explores why some metropolitan cities grow faster than others. The hypothesis is that the differential growth of the metropolitan cities is related to the existence of external economies within and between cities many of which arises from knowledge and creativity. The objective of the research is to understand and model how the external economies affect the intrametropolitan urban growth with special attention to the effects of knowledge and creativity and their transmission across the metropolitan urban system.
     

  • Lazzeretti, Luciana, Boix, Rafael and Capone, Francesco (2008):
    Do creative industries cluster? Mapping Creative Local Production Systems in Italy and Spain”, Working Paper 08.05 Departament d'Economia Aplicada, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

    Abstract: An important debate on the role of creativity and culture as factors of local economic development is distinctly emerging. Despite the emphasis put on the theoretical definition of these concepts, it is necessary to strengthen comparative research for the identification and analysis of the kind of creativity embedded in the territory as well as its determinants. Creative local production systems are identified in Italy and Spain departing from local labour markets as territorial units, and focusing on two different kinds of creative industries: traditional cultural industries (publishing, music, architecture and engineering, performing arts) and technology-related creative industries (R&D, ICT, advertising). The results suggest the existence of different patterns of concentration of creative industries in both countries and the concentration of creative industries in the largest urban.
     

  • Trullén, Joan y Callejón, Maria (2008):
    Las agrupaciones de empresas innovadoras”, Mediterraneo Economico, nº 13, p. 459-478. ISSN: 1698-3726.

    Abstract: En este trabajo se expone un nuevo instrumento de política industrial para la pequeña y mediana empresa favorecedor del proceso innovador de las empresas agrupadas en distritos industriales o clusters. Nos referimos al Programa de Apoyo a las Agrupaciones Empresariales Innovadoras (AEIs). La razón última para la agrupación territorial de empresasde un determinado sector es la existencia de economías de aglomeración que surgen de la colaboración entre ellas, dando lugar a rendimientos crecientes. El objetivo final de esta actuación es apoyar los procesos colaborativos que se generan de forma espontanea entre empresas en aquellas áreas en las que éstas deciden cooperar, lo que conlleva mejoras en su eficiencia y competitividad.
     

  • Boix, Rafael (2008):
    Los distritos industriales en la Europa Mediterránea: los mapas de Italia y España”, Mediterraneo Economico, nº 13, p. 161-181. ISSN: 1698-3726.

    Abstract: El presente trabajo ofrece una comparación de los mapas de distritos industriales marshallianos de España e Italia. elaborados a partir de la metodología Sforzi - ISTAT (2006). Como principales similitudes se destaca que los distritos industriales son una realidad generalizada en ambos países y su importancia relativa es equivalente. se especializan principalmente en industria ligera y mecánica. y muestran una elevada concentración territorial. Como principales diferencias se destaca la mayor especialización relativa de los distritos industriales de España en productos para la casa e industria alimentaria. mientras que en Italia es superior la especialización relativa en industria mecánica. y en textil y confección; la menor dimensión de los distritos industriales españoles respecto de los italianos; y que los distritos industriales españoles tienen una dinámica positiva y superior a la del resto del país. mientras en Italia su dinámica negativa contrasta con la del resto de la economía.
     

  • Boix, Rafael (2008):
    Los distritos industriales en la Europa Mediterránea: los mapas de Italia y España”, Working Paper 08.04 Departament d'Economia Aplicada, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona.

    Abstract: El presente trabajo ofrece una comparación de los mapas de distritos industriales marshallianos de España e Italia. elaborados a partir de la metodología Sforzi - ISTAT (2006). Como principales similitudes se destaca que los distritos industriales son una realidad generalizada en ambos países y su importancia relativa es equivalente. se especializan principalmente en industria ligera y mecánica. y muestran una elevada concentración territorial. Como principales diferencias se destaca la mayor especialización relativa de los distritos industriales de España en productos para la casa e industria alimentaria. mientras que en Italia es superior la especialización relativa en industria mecánica. y en textil y confección; la menor dimensión de los distritos industriales españoles respecto de los italianos; y que los distritos industriales españoles tienen una dinámica positiva y superior a la del resto del país. mientras en Italia su dinámica negativa contrasta con la del resto de la economía.
     

  • > More references ... 1985/1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

 

 

[Home] [References] [Databases] [Researchers] [Links]

 

Department of Applied Economics - Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Edifici B -  08193 Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Vallès), Barcelona (Spain)
Tel. 0034 93 581 22 44 / 0034 93 581 15 28    Fax. 0034 93 581 22 92